My Favorite Waterfall Swimming Holes in Taiwan

I love a challenging waterfall hike but in a (near) tropical country like Taiwan there is nothing better than swimming at a perfect secluded pool on a hot day. I have already published a list of My Favorite Easy Waterfall Hikes and a list of Taiwan’s Ten Most Famous Waterfalls.

It was very, very difficult to reduce this list to just 17 waterfalls with great swimming pools. Initially I started with 40 great waterfall swimming holes and it was very difficult to leave off so many of them. The ones I left off might be just as good and will likely contain many of your favorites as well.

Which waterfall is your favorite swimming hole in Taiwan?

Most of these waterfalls are less known and you can find yourself in an idyllic setting all by yourself. Despite not being very popular, they aren’t very long hikes but they might require hiking off trail (usually in the river bed).

Tragically many drownings have occurred at some of my favorite waterfalls because people went immediately following heavy rainstorms. Usually these swimming holes are as dangerous as the deep end of a swimming pool but after heavy rainstorms (or typhoons) it is possible to be swept downstream or unable to swim out (if inexperienced) against swirling currents. These situations can happen very quickly and even happened on one of my trips (no injuries luckily). If you see fast moving water then it is a good idea to avoid it and alert others to the possible danger unless you are very experienced.

    All 170 waterfall guides (and some hikes) are linked on the above map

Lover’s Gorge Waterfall  情人谷瀑布 (Kaohsiung) was one of the first waterfalls that I visited in Taiwan many years ago. It is a short hike from the parking lot up to a beautiful pool. A landslide has occurred since I last visited and the trail is passable but might be marked as closed.

Click for directions to Lover’s Gorge Waterfall

2. I had rather low expectations for Shuishang Waterfall 水上瀑布 (Nantou) last winter. The creek was mostly dry downstream from the waterfall and the few pictures that I had seen looked alright. We walked around the corner and found a perfect double drop waterfall with a huge swimming pool. I definitely plan on coming back here this summer for a swim in the icy water.

There are many waterfalls near Puli and Sun Moon Lake that could be visited on the same day. I recommend Menggu Waterfall.

Click for directions to Shuishang Waterfall

3. Aohua Waterfall 澳花瀑布 (Yilan) is one of those amazing waterfalls that would be very popular except that it is located very far away from any major population center. But if you are in Hualien then it isn’t that far and you can also visit Qingshui Cliffs on the drive.

Click for directions to Aohua Waterfall

4. Shuiliandong Waterfall 水濂洞瀑布 (Tainan) isn’t very big and it isn’t very well known but the grotto is a great place for a swim on a hot day. You can also stop at Bianfudong (Bat Cave) Waterfall for a second refreshing swim on the way back home.

Click for directions to Shuiliandong Waterfall

5. Caihong (Rainbow) Waterfall  彩虹瀑布 on the Malalou Trail (Taitung) is a giant waterfall that falls down a sheer cliff. Ordinary hikers can’t access the base of the waterfall but they can get to an idyllic pool with a small waterfall. This trail is short and adventurous with numerous creek crossings in <1km. Avoid this trail if there is a threat of rain though.

Caihong Waterfall is near the very famous Sansiantai and you could easily visit both on a daytrip.

Click for directions to Caihong (Rainbow) Waterfall

6. Feilong Waterfall 飛龍瀑布 (Pingtung) is a personal favorite of mine since it is so close and features a large grotto where you can swim under the waterfall. I always like to stop at one of the aboriginal restaurants in Wutai for a large meal of fatty pork, sausages and local vegetables. You can also stop for a swim at Shenshan Waterfall on the way to Feilong Waterfall.

Click for directions to Feilong Waterfall

7. Guguan Dam Waterfall 谷關水壩瀑布 (Taichung) might not be a natural waterfall but the blue water looks amazing for a swim. Maling Hot Spring is another 1.5 hours past Guguan Dam Waterfall.

Click here for directions to Guguan Dam Waterfall

8. Shalawan Waterfall 沙拉灣瀑布 (Pingtung) is one of Taiwan’s best waterfalls. It is just one of many impressive waterfalls in this remote part of Pingtung. The other waterfalls are varying levels of really difficult to impossible to get to though but Shalawan is an easy 30-40 minute walk from the end of a terrible road. It drops about 80 meters into a huge pool.

Currently Closed – Might open at the end of the year.

Click here for directions to Shalawan Waterfall

9. Meihua Waterfall 梅花瀑布 (Hsinchu) is a fun challenge to get to. There are many river tracing guides that lead trips up to the waterfall and I recommend using a helmet and felt shoes if you DIY. The waterfall is great for swimming and the more daring can jump from a variety of heights (not something that I recommend).

Meihua Waterfall is very close to both Qingwashi (Frog Rock) Waterfall and Yuanyang Valley Waterfall. All three could be done during a daytrip to Hsinchu.

Click here for directions to Meihua Waterfall

10. Kuhuatan Waterfall 苦花潭瀑布 (Miaoli) isn’t far from the very popular Shenxian Waterfall but there isn’t much of a trail back to it and very few people even know about it. Further down the road is the even less known is Fengmei Waterfall.

Click here for directions to Kuhuatan Waterfall

11. Qinglong Waterfall 青龍瀑布 (Chiayi) is just one of many virtually unknown waterfalls near Zengwen Reservoir that are great for swimming. The hikes to most of the waterfalls are also an adventure since any paths have long since washed away.

You can also check out LianyunSanlong  and Tianma Waterfalls. You will probably want a full two days to properly explore the area.

Click here for directions to Qinglong Waterfall

12. Jinyue Waterfall 金岳瀑布 (Yilan) is a full blown river trace and one of my favorite experiences in Taiwan. I did this one 5 years and have wanted to go back ever since.

Click for directions to Jinyue Waterfall

13. Lingjiao Waterfall 嶺腳瀑布 (New Taipei) is one of the many waterfalls in the Pingxi area and it is my pick for the best swimming hole in the area. It is a broad waterfall in the Keelung River just upstream from the much more famous Shifen Waterfall.

Click here for directions to Lingjiao Waterfall

14. I saw a photo of this waterfall but they only knew the name was 1000 step waterfall and you just take the train station road out of Chiayi. It took me a little time to find Fenghuang Waterfall 鳳凰瀑布 but it is easy to get to and amazing for a swim on a hot day. Be warned though – there are more than 1000 steps down to the waterfall and you will need to go up at some time.

Click here for directions to Fenghuang Waterfall

15. Golden Grotto Waterfall 黃金峽谷 (Hualien) is one of my favorite waterfalls in Taiwan but the famous waterfall isn’t that great for swimming. There are two smaller tiers downstream that you must climb up and each of them has perfect swimming pools in an enclosed gorge. Guide and gear highly recommended.

Click here for directions to Golden Grotto Waterfall

16. You won’t be able to do any actual swimming at Qikong Waterfall 七孔瀑布 (Pingtung) but it is perfect for relaxing on a hot day.

Check out the Jialeshui Scenic Area first and then stop for a swim afterward at Qikong Waterfall.

Click here for directions to Qikong Waterfall

Which waterfall is your favorite swimming hole in Taiwan?

Explore Taiwan – Maolin and Duona

Maolin was the first area that I explored on motorcycle when I moved to Taiwan 6 years ago. I knew about Typhoon Morakot but I had no idea just how severe it was or how much things had changed. I moved to Taiwan months after Typhoon Morakot but I didn’t know just how devastating it was for many of the aboriginal villages in southern Taiwan. Almost every bridge was taken out in Namasia, the entire Southern Cross Island Highway (parts still closed), Maolin and Wutai (among other places). In addition to that villages were washed away (mostly evacuated) and one village was completely buried (Xiaolin – not evacuated).  Altogether over 600 people likely died and the rebuilding continues today.

Duona was just a dreary ghost town with a couple of basic convenience stores selling snacks on my first visit. Fast forward a couple of years and Duona’s main street is packed with busloads of tourists on weekends and a dozen of stylish restaurants and businesses lining the main street. I have seen the reconstruction of numerous bridges on my various trips. Many of the trails to the sights below have been built in the last 3-4 years and they are so much easier to access.  Things have changed so much for the area and I love going back every time.

My goal is to explore every hidden corner of Taiwan and there will no doubt be even more spectacular places but Maolin will always be a special place because it is where the exploration started. It is also a pretty awesome place with many things to do.

Are there any places that I have left out?  What are your favorite places in Maolin and Duona?  

  1. Maolin is best known for its purple butterflies. There are many places in the world where butterfly migrations pass through yearly but there are only two (known) overwintering valleys in the world. One is in Mexico and the other is in Maolin, Taiwan. The numbers of butterflies have declined but with a little luck you can find swarms of butterflies along the Zishalishi Butterfly Trail in Maolin Village. Before hiking the trail there is a visitor center which explains the significance of the butterfly migration.

Click for directions to Maolin’s Purple Butterfly Valley

2. Lover’s Gorge Waterfall is the most popular of the waterfalls near Maolin and it is one of the best swimming spots in Taiwan. Two bridges (pedestrian and vehicular) to the waterfall have been built since Typhoon Morakot devastated the area in 2009. The rebuilt trail (2014 or 2015) starts at a parking lot waterfall and it is now an easy walk to the 2nd tier (and best tier) of the waterfall.

Click for directions to Lover’s Gorge Waterfall

3. After Typhoon Morakot, Douna Suspension Bridge was the only bridge that wasn’t destroyed. For awhile it provided the only permanent connection to Duona Village at the end of road 132. Today most traffic goes over a new bridge but tourists can still visit the 103 meter tall bridge (tallest in Taiwan) and hike out to nearby Longtoushan (Dragon Head Mountain).

Click for directions to Duona Suspension Bridge

4. Longtoushan and Shetoushan are pair of interesting case studies into Taiwan’s fascination of naming rocks and hills after animals that they vaguely resemble. In this case these are actually pretty cool.

Longtoushan (Dragon Head Mountain)

Shetoushan (Snake Head Mountain)

View the full blog post from one of my first trips to Maolin

5. I was originally told that Meiya Waterfall was broken up by several different sources but broken up seemed like a strange description and I was determined to investigate as far as I could. I was initially turned away by an impending rainstorm but the following year I walked up the creek to find Meiya Waterfall. The trail is completely destroyed though and visitors will have to pick their way through a rock field in the creek. There are rumors about a new trail being built but so far the project hasn’t started. Hopefully they don’t remove the best Chinglish sign ever.

6. I found Deengorge Guesthouse completely by accident 5 years ago. I was exploring Maolin a year or two after Typhoon Morakot and went down a random road ending up at the guesthouse on a Sunday evening. They were as surprised to see me as I was to see them since very few tourists came to Maolin after the big typhoon and even fewer ventured as far as Deengorge. We chatted for awhile and this has become my favorite campground in Taiwan. One of my favorite memories is the guesthouse owner looking at all of the frogs in the middle of the night because he heard an unusual croak that sounded different than the 12 species that are usually present.

Click for directions to Deengorge Guesthouse

7.  On my first or second trip to Deengorge I asked about the name of the waterfall near the guesthouse and they said it doesn’t have a name and it is only used for drinking water. I might have been the first person that was ever interested in that little waterfall but it is a nice two tier waterfall right next to the road and I have thus named it Deengorge Waterfall.

Click for directions to Deengorge Waterfall

8. I first attempted to go to Maolin Waterfall in 2012 and was told that it was an easy hike. Instead I found bridges lying in the creek and no trail so I improvised and walked up the creek (a lot of fun). Ultimately I was blocked by a small waterfall and wasn’t able to get to Maolin Waterfall. I still put it up on the guide but later I started getting comments about not having to walk in the creek and pictures of a completely different waterfall from confused hikers. In 2014 the government built a beautiful trail (27M TWD) back to Maolin Waterfall. This has become one of my favorite waterfalls in Taiwan.

Click for directions to Maolin Waterfall

9. On one of my trips to Deengorge I was told about the Tapakadrawane Festival happening that night in Duona. Tapakadrawane is a harvest festival that ironically is held at almost the same time as American Thanksgiving. Many groups participated in a talent show but the highlight of the evening was a ceremony similar to homecoming king and queen. About a dozen young men and a dozen young women performed and gave speeches in hopes of winning.

View the full blog post

10. Guifu Canyon is one of the rarest places that I have visited in Taiwan. Downstream and upstream the creek is a fairly typical green valley filled with river rock but for a short stretch it becomes a narrow slot canyon with steep walls and a waterfall drops into it from a sidestream. The end is blocked by a 2nd shorter waterfall. Trips need a little luck to be successful. If it has rained heavily recently then you won’t be able to enter the canyon and the waterfall dries up during the winter.

Click for directions to Guifu Waterfall

11. Weiliaoshan is at the entrance of Maolin Valley and it is a challenging but excellent dayhike. The trail follows the ridgeline on the Kaohsiung and Pingtung county line rising 1275 meters in 8.5 km.  The last 3 km are particularly steep and rocky.

Click here for directions to Weiliaoshan

12. I haven’t hiked the Liugui Special Garrison Trail yet but Tyler has provided excellent details on a lost and overgrown section of the trail in his new blog. The Liugui Special Garrison Trail is a 50 kilometer route along a ridgeline all the way from Dajin to Baolai. The trail was built by the Japanese and had a police station every kilometer. Now the police stations are just piles of rocks and only sections of the trail are walkable. Tyler plans on blogging about these sections next on his blog.  You can follow his blog at tylercottenie.wordpress.com.

Note – I wouldn’t recommend walking the section that Tyler did in his blog but the other sections look very interesting.

Click to view the full blog post

13.  There are three waterfalls located just outside Maolin Valley that can be a fun side trip. Dajin Waterfall is very popular on weekends and goes up (and then down) over 800 stairs. Dazhi Waterfall is a decent waterfall but it goes dry early in the season (read between the lines here – it is one of my least favorites). My recommendation would be Hulugu (Calabash or Gourd Valley) Waterfall for a cool little area to explore or relax.

14.  One area that I would like to explore further is an overgrown trail at Meiya Waterfall. The sign is now obscured and unreadable but it mentioned an old aboriginal village somewhere up the hill. It is also possible that this trail leads up to an overlook for Meiya Waterfall.

15. I don’t know anything about Wanshan Petroglyphs but I have been told that it is strictly off limits unless you arrange a local guide (no idea how to arrange a guide though). This is on my secondary (or tertiary) to do list. I have so many other trips planned in Taiwan before I figure out how to go back there.

16. There is a small waterfall and hot spring up one of the river valleys but I lost the blog link to it. Based on memory this required an overnight camping trip (maybe 15 km each way).

17. I definitely need to add more info on things to do in Duona and Maolin Villages. There are numerous cool spots (including UBAKE art space) and we have eaten some amazing food. We enjoyed the meal below from the Diplomatic (?) Restaurant near the main intersection in Maolin. We also ate roasted chicken in Duona and the food at Deengorge (a large set meal) was delicious. One local specialty is xiaomijiu (millet wine). On two separate occasions this led to disasters though so be prepared for the bottles to explode (when opening). I don’t even want to write about the other disaster.  It was awful.

18. And just so people are clear – Duona Hot Springs are completely buried by 10+ meters of rock (Typhoon Morakot). Perhaps they will excavate this in the future but I have not heard of any plans to do so.  There might be plans to setup a hot spring at a different location but I don’t know any details about it.

Are there any places that I have left out?  What are your favorite places in Maolin and Duona?